Replicating paintings onto skin isn’t easy. There are little nuances about the painting which make it lovable by the patrons that view it and the pressure to do the artist’s work justice is on like a foot smashing a bug. I was very lucky though, because the piece being replicated is beautiful. The work is created by an artist named Heather Reynolds who resides in Boston, MA and I have to say… I’m a new fan of her work. Intricate, detailed, imaginative, well-designed, well executed and overall nice techniques. Makes me remember why I love painting so much. This is a piece the client purchased from the artist many years ago and kept saying “I’mma get this tattooed on me some day.” Well that day came, and woooooooo what a day! When we first started, the client laid and read a book for the first few hours. As time progress and the area became tender, the fidgeting and moaning began… hour number 3.5 and the screams of horror and pain entered the picture… literally. I mean, you would have thought I was tearing her breasts off with a rusty pair of pliers. I admittedly laughed a few times. I sometimes forget people do scream with these things. But luckily the client and I have known each other for the past 15 years so it was cool on both ends lol! At one point I had to count down the number of times I was going to do final touches on her tattoo so she wouldn’t holler any more (I started from 10 down to 0). One for the memories 🙂

The client wanted me to remind everyone that when you get tattooed it is highly recommended that you eat something before you go in. It will help out with the pain. Also, realize what you are getting into. Good tattoos take longer than you think, so prepare yourself mentally.

In case you didn’t click on the artists name above (you should, it’ll take you to her site and you can check out her hot ass works!!!!), here’s her website in longhand for ya:

http://www.crowned.org/

check her out, love her stuff, BUY SOME GREAT WORK!!!!!

This was created with a 5 tight liner, 14 round shader, #12 09 curved magnum (need the stiff needle for color work) and starbrite and eternal inks.

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